NASA’s Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) telescope on International Space Station (ISS) has detected the brightest X-ray burst so far that was caused by an extensive thermonuclear flash on the surface of a pulsar.

NASA’s Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) telescope on International Space Station (ISS) has detected the brightest X-ray burst so far that was caused by an extensive thermonuclear flash on the surface of a pulsar. The crushed remains of a star that collapsed long ago as a supernova is called pulsar.

NASA said in a press statement that the rapid spike of X-rays was detected at about 10:04 pm EDT on August 20. The burst came from an object called J1808, which is located about 11,000 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. According to NASA, No single burst has disclosed so many phenomena together.

“The explosion, which astronomers categorize as a Type I X-ray burst, released as much energy in 20 seconds as the Sun does in closely 10 days. The detail NICER captured on this record-setting ejection will help astronomers fine-tune their understanding of the physical processes driving the thermonuclear flare-ups of it and other bursting pulsars,” NASA said in the statement.

The X-Ray brightness of J1808 leveled off for almost a second as the burst started. However, it started to increase again at a slower pace. According to NASA, the “stall” was the moment when the energy of the blast built up enough to blow the pulsar’s hydrogen layer into space.

 

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Friday, Dec 6, 2019